The 50 Best Albums of 2016

In this post: an introduction, reviews of the top 10 albums of the year, a complete top 50 list, and a streaming playlist with a track from every top 50 album save for those not on Spotify. See you in 2017!

There were no seismic shifts in the pop landscape in 2016, nor in 2015, nor in 2014, nor in recent memory. The last time I remember feeling a legit sense of the earth moving under my feet (um, ears?) was when in 2006-2007 the Neptunes and Timbaland ceded ground to Kanye West’s now-dated chipmunked vocal samples, The White Stripes (and before them, The Strokes) firmly rewrote the pop-rock template and the Dixie Chicks told the world they weren’t ready to make nice. All the change since then has felt incremental, which may be a function of my age, but aside from maybe Drake and 40, who has rewritten the playbook — anyone’s playbook? Maybe it doesn’t work like that anymore. Technological change can generally be seen only in the rear-view mirror, but I can’t help thinking it’s changing the way the music evolves. Weep for the future historians who have to find a through-line in the evolution of music in the teens.

If that’s the way things are, or will be, then 2016 was the year I stopped worrying and learned to love the absence of a bomb. None of the albums on my top 10 list feel like any kind of quantum leap forward, but they are all masterful and constantly stimulating, even surprising, on the tenth or even fiftieth listen. It’s pretty shocking to me that a straight-up gangsta rap record like Still Brazy or an instrumental-rock spazzout like Return To Sky would end up atop my list, to the point that I often wonder whether I’ve started privileging the familiar over the unexpected as a kind of defensive mechanism, against the shell-shock of the new. But the flipside of that is my disdain for the records proclaimed as epochal (Arcade Fire *durrr*, Taylor Swift *yawn*) has made me more enthusiastic about records that feature maturing talents, like Blonde, and that showcase mature artists operating at their peak, like Anguis Oleum and A Moon Shaped Pool. It’s exciting to be around when the music world is being turned upside down, but it’s no consolation prize to bear witness to a crop of artists who be doin it and doin it and doin it well.

1. Frank Ocean - Blonde (Boys Don't Cry)

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Team Frank Ocean was already a heaving bandwagon when Blonde dropped, though to these ears the hype was premature when Channel Orange was the only evidence on offer. Whatever, I probably wouldn't have thought Prince was a genius on the basis of his first album, and yet, and yet. Blonde is plenty full of genius-signaling greatness, in flashes of wry lyrical humor ("did you call me from a seance? You from my past life") and epic ballads like "White Ferrari" that just scream This Is Everything You Never Dared Hope He Could Become. There's something in Ocean's ability to leave a line hanging in the synth-soaked, sometimes guitar-wrist-flick-punctuated air. He owns the space between words, shapes it invisibly with the last line and the next one. Even the funkier moments like "Pink + White" are expertly paced hops from one melodic cloud to the next, with his signature move of brightening the harmony in mid-lyric. More than any other impulse he seems to have, Frank Ocean just loves to yank the listener from nostalgic, sometimes idyllic images drenched in romance to mundane, pungent detail about drugs or, often, driving. "We're alone, making sweet love, taking time / but god strikes us!" To me, the centerpiece of the album is "Solo" for the simple reason that it works on a granular detail level -- capturing a moment of pure bliss from an acid trip on a dance floor -- but it also works its way gradually through a heartbreak that left him alone, exposed without a lover and without the rhythm section whose absence leaves a joy-shaped hole in the track. Absence and space are the most expressive parts of the album, and knowing how to play them is irrefutable proof that Frank Ocean has ascended to a higher plane. Though if he really were some kind of god, he'd be the kind that likes to day-trip back to earth, maybe as a swan, just to mess with some poor human for a few hours before returning skyward.

 Selections from a-void’s Best Albums of 2016

 The List: 1-10

1. Frank Ocean – Blonde (Boys Don’t Cry)
2. YG – Still Brazy (400/CTE/Def Jam)
3. Lorenzo Senni – Persona (Warp)
*4. Tim Berne’s Snakeoil – Anguis Oleum (Screwgun)
5. Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith and Suzanne Ciani – FRKWAYS Vol 13: Sunergy (RVNG Intl)
6. Causa Sui – Return To Sky (El Paraiso)
7. Pangaea – In Drum Play (Hessle Audio)
8. Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool (XL)
9. DVA [HI:EMOTIONS] – Notu_Ironlu (Hyperdub)
10. Kaytranada – 99.9 (XL)

 11-50

11. Pet Shop Boys – Super (X2)
12. Vince Staples – Prima Donna EP (Def Jam)
13. Weaves – Weaves (Buzz)
14. Parquet Courts – Human Performance (Matador)
15. Dinosaur Jr – Give A Glimpse Of What Yr Not (Jagjaguwar)
16. Matmos – Ultimate Care II (Thrill Jockey)
17. Gucci Mane – Everybody Looking (Atlantic)
18. *Purling Hiss – High Bias (Drag City)
19. A Tribe Called Red – We Are The Halluci Nation (Pirates Blend)
20. *Useless Eaters – Relaxing Death (Castle Face)
21. The Gaslamp Killer – Instrumentalepathy (Gaslamp Killer Music)
22. The 1975 – I Like It When You Sleep, For You Are So Beautiful Yet So Unaware Of It (Dirty Hit/Interscope/Polydor/Vagrant)
23. Skepta – Konnichiwa (Boy Better Know)
24. Bardo Pond feat Guru Guru and Acid Mothers Temple – Acid Guru Pond (Fire)
25. Car Seat Headrest – Teens Of Denial (Matador)
26. A Tribe Called Quest – We Got It From Here… Thank You For Your Service (Epic/Sony)
27. Kenny Barron – Book Of Intuition (Impulse/Universal)
28. Poirier – Migration (Nice Up!)
29. Hieroglyphic Being And The Configurative Or Modular Me Trio – Cosmic Bebop (Mathematics)
30. Camera – Phantom of Liberty (Bureau B)
31. Rihanna – Anti (Def Jam)
32. The Field – The Follower (Kompakt)
33. Trevino – Front (C Birdie)
34. Marquis Hawkes – Social Housing (Houndstooth)
35. Warpaint – Heads Up (XL)
36. *Fp-oner – 6 (Mule Musiq)
37. Lone – Levitate (R&S)
38. *Lawrence – Yoyogi Park (Mule Musiq)
39. Black Milk and Nat Turner – The Rebellion Sessions (Computer Ugly)
40. Pye Corner Audio – Stasis (Ghost Box)
41. Africaine 808 – Basar (Golf Channel)
42. *Andrew Cyrille – The Declaration of Musical Independence (ECM)
43. Dr. Lonnie Smith – Evolution (Blue Note)
44. Jakob Skott – All The Colours of the Dust (El Paraiso)
45. Dynamis – Distance (Tectonic)
46. Gerry Read – Chubby Cheeks (Timetable)
47. Solange – A Seat At The Table (Columbia/Sony)
48. Steve Haushcildt – Strands (Kranky)
49. Future – EVOL (Epic/Sony)
50. Prins Thomas – Principe Del Norte (Smalltown Supersound)

* = not on Spotify

New old mix: Rapture

folder

Last week the Isley Brothers released a 23-cd boxed set of their RCA Victor and T-Neck (their own label) output, which includes some of the smoovest music ever made. I am fairly obsessed with ’80s Minneapolis-sounding electro R&B/funk (Prince/Cameo/etc) and have been plotting this mix for some time. I have listened to it so much I think I may already have burned out on it and have no feelings left. I am a robot. Pray for deemo. Enjoy!

Click here to download from Mediafire

1. Mandre – Fantasy
2. Dan Lissvik – Airwalk
3. KZA – Computerstimme
4. Todd Terje – Alfonso Muskedunder (Bullion Remix)
5. Joe – Thinkin About
6. The Police – Voices Inside My Head (DJ Harvey edit)
7. Golden Teacher – Back And Forth (Dennis Bovell dub)
8. Boof – Just On The Swings
9. Youandewan – Youandewan ’93
10. Aphex Twin – XMAS_EVET1 N
11. Blondie – Rapture (Wuss + Lame edit)
12. Prince – Head
13. Pye Corner Audio and Belbury Poly – Pathways
14. Robert Palmer – I Didn’t Mean To Turn You On
15. Cameo – Be Yourself
16. The Isley Brothers – Livin In The Life
17. The Cars – Let’s Go

Mixed on July 25, 2015 by Dave Morris a.k.a. deemo for a-void.ca

Deemo – Rapture by Deemo on Mixcloud

a-void.ca’s best albums of 2014

Click here to listen to the Soundcloud playlist, featuring tracks from each album

WHERE IS T-SWIFT?

Ok, I admit it, I didn’t listen to it. Nor did I get through albums by Ariana Grande, Ed Sheeran, Jessie J, Keyshia Cole, Calvin Harris, et al and sundry. I also didn’t hear all of Ariel Pink, Foxygen, Swans, TV on the Radio, Leonard Cohen, Julian Casablancas and too many others to count. Don’t even talk to me about jazz or country. (I wouldn’t have much of interest to say.) So WTF *did* I listen to? I’m not even sure how to describe it. Dave-core? Morris-dance? …maybe it’s better if I don’t.

This is the odd post-poptimist desert I feel like I’ve been sent to, via my escape pod hurtling from the full time music-crit grind. The barriers have all fallen – like a lot of right-thinking people, I’m perfectly happy to flip flop from Nicki Minaj to Neil Young to Young Thug in the space of an hour, but what happens when you don’t have time to devote to what might properly be called truly Catholic tastes? Does my embracing of a specialty – electronic music, not even really including the hip-hop that used to be part of my professional bag – mean I’ve re-embraced some of the biases I spent the early 2000s working to shed, like an earnest young Chinese party bureaucrat devouring Marx and Mao, and then giving it up in favour of Day Trading For Dummies?

It’s not a question of openness, I’ve realized, but a question of how you apportion your listening time. For better or for worse, I shoved the stuff that seemed like a long shot into a hard drive folder marked ‘Later’ and threw on another platter of grime, and this is the list that came out.. There was certainly no kind of shortage of amazing electronics to digest; the volume of almost-worthy discs attests to that. (Sorry Tre Mission, SBTRKT, DMX Krew, Shi Wisdom, Mark McGuire, Run The Jewels, Pop Ambient 2015, I could go on.) The LPs that did make the cut seemed not quite dancefloor friendly, except in an abstract sense. Bits and pieces of LV and Joshua Idehen, Caribou, Distal et al slipped into my mixes with scant friction. But the inventiveness I loved often didn’t fit in the space between floor-filling singles, not that I mind. Still, this is a list borne of someone who experienced dance music in 2014 mostly in a bedroom or between headphones. Simon Reynolds’ inveighing against IDM-like anti-dancefloorism aside, I don’t think that’s a bad thing.

The startling truth is that being kind of lazy, in terms of challenging your sense of what you like, can still be an astonishingly rich listening experience. There was enough originality and delight in my year in albums to make the absence of all that pop and hip-hop I missed feel about as painful as the knowledge that I didn’t eat nearly enough artisanal cheese in the last twelve months – not quite the sting of regret as much as the vague acknowledgement that I may have missed something good, possibly, but it’s not keeping me up at night.

If I had one thing I would ask of dance music in 2015, it would be for the most hypnotic, challenging, arresting, electrifying albums to be a little more melodic. I love the discs I chose, but as a whole I felt like my diet was a smidge on the grey side. Producers like Mumdance and Logos, Peverelist, Objekt and others put out single after single of holy-shit-guys-listen-to-this-ism, but when I put them all in a mix, I ended up taking a bunch out and replacing them with some chooons to break up the monotony. And the grab-bag of albums felt roughly the same, though I didn’t curate this list in a similar way. You can’t turn down a slamming, mesmerizing beat like the ones all over the Next Life comp or the Clap! Clap! record, melody or no. Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker.

Two totally bitchin’ albums you may have missed

toddterje

Todd Terje
It’s Album Time
Olsen

Much has been made of how long many of us have been waiting for Todd Terje’s magnificent, kitschy, richly detailed, party-starting masterwork of an album. Less has been written about why everyone wanted an album from Terje so bad, as though a series of singles wasn’t basically the same thing. Joke’s on you, album-lovers: the best cuts on It’s Album Time have already been released as… wait for it… singles. The man is not what you’d call prolific, and what’s wrong with that? Stupid insatiable free market.

Anyways, we’re still richer for knowing that Terje is not just a great programmer but also a keyboard savant; other producers sample riffs from latin-jazz-fusion rarities, but I’ll bet my piano-key tie that Terje’s playing the stuff himself. “Preben Goes To Acapulco”  sounds like it was made by someone who’s spent a lot of time with Weather Report and/or Herbie Hancock’s mid-’70s catalog, “Svenk Sas” and “Alfonso Muskedunder” are built on montunos fast enough to at least startle Chucho Valdes, and all of them feature what seems like an endless supply of vintage-synth wibble-wobble soloing. All of these things make me indescribably happy, in case you were wondering where I was going with this.

But it’s the dance-iest tracks that really make the album more than a retro pastiche, and I defy anyone to stay still when “Strandbar” comes on. If this album has a flaw (other than the Bryan Ferry vocal on “Johnny and Mary,” which isn’t my cup of lounge-lizard mumbling, but your mileage may vary) it’s that the version of “Strandbar” is only 4-odd minutes long, unlike the 12-inch version. Four minutes of that unstoppable Rube Goldberg-goes-disco machine, even with its brilliant and harmonically sophisticated piano-led bridge, is not nearly enough. You’ll like the other tracks, and it’s no exaggeration to say you need this collection as a whole, but if you don’t listen to “Strandbar” early and often, frankly I’m a bit worried for your general well-being. They should hand out copies in office buildings and stores, like hand sanitizer.


CS518246-01A-BIG

Pye Corner Audio
Black Mill Tapes Vols. 3-4
Type

Some years ago I got in the funny habit of combing through those newsletters that record stores like Amoeba and Aquarius put out, and making a list of any records I’d never heard of, but that sounded interesting so that I could add them to my eMusic saved items. You’d think with the bazillion records hitting the interwebs every day, not to mention the plethora of media sources offering to filter said bazillion records according to your taste, culling an artificially-selected herd of new records every week would be a colossal waste of time. Funnily enough, it hasn’t been.

One of the discoveries I remember making a big impression (and coming out in 2010, around the same time as the similar-in-nature Moon Wiring Club and Belbury Poly) was Pye Corner Audio, whose Black Mill Tapes Vol. 1 was one of the year’s highlights. It seemed like a quixotic project that would appeal more to synth nerds than to listeners – it can’t have been an accident that the pseudonym of the man behind the 1970s and 1980s school-science-filmstrip was “The Head Technician.” But most nerds can’t make a catchy number out of their virtuosic attention to detail, which is why it’s so gratifying when one of them does it – and in robust quantities.

If you had to be fleeing a villainous cyborg or removing a mind-control device from your crainium, you’d want the soundtrack to be the carefully-constructed yet gauzy ambiance of “Memory Wiped” or the music-box-synths gone sinister and John Carpenter-y of “Electronic Rhythm Number Eight.” More surprising to me was the emergence of dancefloor-ready tracks amid the sci-fi-soundtrack fodder. Both “Electronic Rhythm Number Two” and “Void Bound” have a kind of dull, rubbery sheen to their pulsing grooves that make them great set-openers, all you budding DJs. Oh and did I mention that synth nerds will love this? Because you will. Love this.

Mix: Deemo – Melt

deemo - melt

Why do post-long-weekend weeks feel longer despite being shorter? How many angels dance on the head of a pin? Who needs a drink? I can only answer the last one, but this cosmic disco mix will go well with beverages with tropical fruit in them. Enjoy.

Recorded Oct 15 2013 by Dave Morris for a-void.ca

1. Jan Hammer – Crockett’s Theme – Crockett’s Theme (MCA)
2. Pye Corner Audio – Zero Centre – Superstitious Century (Boomkat)
3. Peter Gordon & Factory Floor – Beachcombing – Beachcombing/C Side (Optimo Music)
4. Lapalux – Swallowing Smoke – Nostalchic (Brainfeeder)
5. Golden Teacher – Like A Hawk – Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (Optimo Music)
6. Lusine – Lucky (Steve Hauschildt remix) – Lucky (Ghostly International)
7. Kaito – Behind My Life – Behind My Life (Kompakt)
8. Le Carousel – Stick Together – Stick Together (Phil Kieran Recordings)
9. The Mole – History of Dates – History of Dates EP (Perlon)
10. Herbie Hancock – Just Around The Corner – Mr. Hands (Columbia)
11. Matias Aguayo – Minimal (DJ Koze remix) – 20 Jahre Kompakt Collection 1 (Kompakt)
12. Siriusmo – Congratulator – Enthusiast (Monkeytown)
13. Jonas Reinhardt – Private Life of a Diamond – Mask of the Maker (Not Not Fun)
14. Prins Thomas – Flau Pappadans (DJ Fett Burger Taekaeli mix) – Bobletekno & Flau Pappadans Versions (Full Pupp)
15. Oyvind Morken – Gikk Av Pa Holmlia – Kakemonsteret (Full Pupp)
16. Todd Terje – Strandbar (Disko version) Strandbar (Olsen)
17. Carter Tutti – Coolicon-A – Coolicon (Conspiracy International)

Click here to download from Mediafire

Deemo – Melt by Deejaydeemo on Mixcloud

Mix: Back To The Garden

**this mix has been taken down**

I is returned! And this is one of the mixes I am prouder of than many. Let us begin with sounds. Bump it in your jeep.

Jermiah Jae & Oliver The 2nd – Purple Moonshine Pt. 2 ft IsReal [self-released]
Mike Gao – Precipice (Precipitate) [HW&W]
Tokimonsta – Park Walks [All City]
Siriusmo – Enthusiast [Monkeytown]
Boxcutter – Neo-Geocities (Web 2.0 Remix) [Planet Mu]
Pusha T – Numbers On The Boards [G.O.O.D.]
Quasimoto – Brothers Can’t See Me [Stones Throw]
Ras G – News @ 11 [Leaving]
Mo Kolours – Laser Wind Tunnel [One-Handed Music]
Letherette – Furth & Myre [Ninja Tune]
Pye Corner Audio – Wasted Evolution [Boomkat Editions]
Electronome – V = For ViewLexx [Viewlexx]
Mono/Poly – Swarm [Self-released]
French Fries – Everything [ClekClekBoom]
L-Vis 1990 – Signal [Night Slugs]
Martyn – Oceania [Dolly Dubs]
Salva – Drop That B [Friends Of Friends]
Rustie – Triadzz [Numbers]
TNGHT – Bugg’n [Warp]
Kingdom – Bank Head f Kelela [Fade To Mind]